Book Review: Persuasion by Jane Austen

25597577Title: Persuasion
Author: Jane Austen
Publisher: Random House UK
Pub Date: November 1, 2014
Format: Paperback, Vintage Classics Edition
Pages: 320
Source: Purchased
Genre(s): Classics, Romance
Rating: ★★
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Book Review: Notes from the Midnight Drive by Jordan Sonnenblick

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Synopsis from Goodreads:

One car crash. One measly little car crash. And suddenly, I’m some kind of convicted felon.

My parents are getting divorced, my dad is shacking up with my third-grade teacher, I might be in love with a girl who could kill me with one finger, and now I’m sentenced to babysit some insane old guy. What else could possibly go wrong?

This is the story of Alex Gregory, his guitar, his best gal pal Laurie, and the friendship of a lifetime that he never would have expected.

My mini-review:

“We’re all free to choose some people to love, and then do it.”

I tried reading this book in January but stopped halfway because it seemed so predictable, and frankly, I was bored out of my mind. This time around (I figured I should give it another shot), I was still bored out of my mind. All that I thought would happen, definitely happened. Love was found. Things were lost. Lessons were learned. There were some strong attempts at humour in this book but it was almost “too much” to be considered funny. The only reason I finished this book was to give it a fair chance, but it just wasn’t for me.

★★ (2 stars) for Solomon Lewis.

Book Review: Unite Me by Tahereh Mafi

Synopsis from Goodreads:

Destroy Me tells the events between Shatter Me and Unravel Me from Warner’s point of view. Even though Juliette shot him in order to escape, Warner can’t stop thinking about her—and he’ll do anything to get her back. But when the Supreme Commander of The Reestablishment arrives, he has much different plans for Juliette. Plans Warner cannot allow.

Fracture Me is told from Adam’s perspective and bridges the gap between Unravel Me and Ignite Me. As the Omega Point rebels prepare to fight the Sector 45 soldiers, Adam’s more focused on the safety of Juliette, Kenji, and his brother. The Reestablishment will do anything to crush the resistance . . . including killing everyone Adam cares about.

My review:

“I’ve never read anything like this before. I’ve never read anything that could speak directly to my bones.”

That awkward moment when Warner’s thoughts seem to be just as annoyingly “purple prose” as Juliette’s. Ew. Don’t do that, Warner.

This was kind of disappointing. I waited a week after finishing the trilogy before I let myself read this, thinking that the words from Warner’s P.O.V. would be very satisfying. It wasn’t. It was predictable. And I didn’t even get the sense of his character. It was like reading Juliette’s thoughts but with a swapped gender role. It was literally a regurgitation from the scenes in Unravel Me/Ignite Me. Oh, and I should mention that I did not care for Adam’s P.O.V. at all. No interest whatsoever. It was bad.

Let’s not forget about Juliette’s annoying journal/diary thing. It is everything I hated about the series when I first started reading it. The repetition repetition repetition and distracting confusing sentences that were crossed out altogether. All in all, it was like sad poetry. And I did not want to read sad poetry. I wanted to read a dystopian-ish YA novel.

Still, I will give this ★★ (2.5 stars). I wanted a little more of Warner, and I got it. It’s just not the parts of him I thought I’d be getting. I think I should have went into this book with lower expectations.

Book Review: The Prince of Venice Beach by Blake Nelson

Synopsis from Goodreads:

Robert “‘Cali” Callahan is a teen runaway, living on the streets of Venice Beach, California. He’s got a pretty sweet life: a treehouse to sleep in, a gang of surf bros, a regular basketball game…even a girl who’s maybe-sorta interested in him.

What he doesn’t have is a plan.

All that changes when a local cop recommends Cali to a private investigator who is looking for a missing teenager. After all, Cali knows everyone in Venice. But the streets are filled with people who don’t want to be found, and when he’s hired to find the beautiful Reese Abernathy, who would do anything to stay hidden, Cali must decide where his loyalties truly lie.

My mini-review:

I’m not quite sure how I feel about this book. It had the potential to be really great, I think. Maybe it would have been better as a series. The thing is, I had no clue what it was about when I picked it up and I still kind of feel the same way after finishing it. I suppose I’m trying to figure out what the point of it was. I needed more (from the prince himself). Cali’s character never really materialized for me.

★★ (2.5 stars) because I actually think this could be developed into a pretty interesting television series. It has a Veronica Mars-y vibe to it.