Book Review: Children of Blood and Bone (Legacy of Orïsha, #1) by Tomi Adeyemi

34728667Title: Children of Blood and Bone
Author: Tomi Adeyemi
Publisher: Henry Holt BFYR
Pub Date: March 6, 2018
Format: Hardcover
Pages: 525
Source: Purchased
Genre(s): YA, Fantasy
Rating: ★★★★½
[Goodreads] ● [Amazon] ● [Book Depository]

Continue reading

Wrap-Up: March 2016

Hello, lovely readers! What a good month it has been. By “good”, I mean that this month was slightly better than February in terms of the number of books read, as well as the quality of those books. The month in general had me in a life slump, but that’s not important.

If you can’t be bothered to read the rest of this post, you can watch my wrap-up on YouTube instead. Just click here.

In total, I read 12 books this month. Among those 12, I’ve acquired two new all-time-favourites: An Ember in the Ashes and Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe. For the sake of being organized, I separated all the books by their star ratings and linked to their full reviews (for your convenience).


★★★★★


27774758.jpg

Full review here.

12000020.jpg

Full review here.

3876

Full review here.


★★★★


18459855

Full review here.

26053936

Full review here.

22557272

Full review here.

23203106

Full review here.


★★★


11617647

Full review here.

22068591

Full review here.

23597888

Full review here.

24885508

Full review here.


★★


FC_BC_9780439757812

Full review here.


That’s all, folks!

Feel free to leave me any questions or comments regarding what I’ve read or said.

Book Review: The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway

3876.jpg

Synopsis from  Goodreads:

The quintessential novel of the Lost Generation, The Sun Also Rises is one of Ernest Hemingway’s masterpieces and a classic example of his spare but powerful writing style. A poignant look at the disillusionment and angst of the post-World War I generation, the novel introduces two of Hemingway’s most unforgettable characters: Jake Barnes and Lady Brett Ashley. The story follows the flamboyant Brett and the hapless Jake as they journey from the wild nightlife of 1920s Paris to the brutal bullfighting rings of Spain with a motley group of expatriates. It is an age of moral bankruptcy, spiritual dissolution, unrealized love, and vanishing illusions.

My mini-review:

“Going to another country doesn’t make any difference. I’ve tried all that. You can’t get away from yourself by moving from one place to another. There’s nothing to that.”

This is by far one of my favourites by Hemingway.

I understand that the detailed narration and repetition may put off some readers, but that’s the best thing about it. It’s the best thing about all of Hemingway’s books. The writing is detached and pragmatic and almost always aimless. Maybe you want to scream: “Tell me something I don’t know, Hemingway!”, but that’s the beauty of it all. He’s telling us what we already know, about the world, about life, about us.

★★★★★ (5 stars) for the unsavory aftertaste of being in love.

Dear Ernest, we could have had such a damned good time together. At least, isn’t it pretty to think so?